Andrew Wegmann
Assistant Professor, Delta State University
Read Andrew's Posts

I am Assistant Professor of History at Delta State University where I teach courses on the Early American Republic and the Atlantic World. My research and teaching interests include African-American history, the history of ideas, global colonialism, and race and freedom in the Atlantic World. I often look for ways to allow my students to experience history and the processes involved in its creation—including roleplaying exercises, creative and collaborative projects, and the use of contemporary comparisons to create connections between students’ experiences and the past. This lets students become part of the history they study, and more fully understand how history is fundamentally human.

As far as scholarship is concerned, I am the author of the forthcoming book, Skin Color and Social Practice: The Problem of Race and Class in the Atlantic South, 1718-1865, as well as a co-author of U.S. History: A Top Hat Interactive Textbook, published in August 2016. My research has also appeared in a number of journals and edited collections, most recently The Journal of Transatlantic StudiesThe Journal of African American History, and Social Identities. My academic interests vary widely—from West African state formation to racial identities in colonial New Spain and the American South—and as a result, my teaching experience likewise casts a wide net. I have taught courses at community colleges as well as large universities, led seminars on racial ideologies and surveys on global history, and taught classes with enrollments between 185 and 16 students. I am interested in producing scholarship designed for students and a general readership, which has led me to edit and write a chapter of The American Yawp, a revolutionary, free, online textbook available at www.AmericanYawp.com. I have also written extensively for the general public on the state of soccer (football), and the role it plays in global, colonial, and cultural history, especially in the United States and post-colonial Africa. I am also developing an interactive, undergraduate capstone course on the cultural and political value of the sport in the World Cup era (1930-present).

I am excited to contribute my experiences and ideas to Teaching United States History, and look forward to becoming part of a remarkable and timely pedagogical movement.

I am Assistant Professor of History at Delta State University where I teach courses on the Early American Republic and the Atlantic World. My research and teaching interests include African-American history, the history of ideas, global colonialism, and race and freedom in the Atlantic World. I often look for ways to allow my students to experience history and the processes involved in its creation—including roleplaying exercises, creative and collaborative projects, and the use of contemporary comparisons to create connections between students’ experiences and the past. This lets students become part of the history they study, and more fully understand how history is fundamentally human.

As far as scholarship is concerned, I am the author of the forthcoming book, Skin Color and Social Practice: The Problem of Race and Class in the Atlantic South, 1718-1865, as well as a co-author of U.S. History: A Top Hat Interactive Textbook, published in August 2016. My research has also appeared in a number of journals and edited collections, most recently The Journal of Transatlantic StudiesThe Journal of African American History, and Social Identities. My academic interests vary widely—from West African state formation to racial identities in colonial New Spain and the American South—and as a result, my teaching experience likewise casts a wide net. I have taught courses at community colleges as well as large universities, led seminars on racial ideologies and surveys on global history, and taught classes with enrollments between 185 and 16 students. I am interested in producing scholarship designed for students and a general readership, which has led me to edit and write a chapter of The American Yawp, a revolutionary, free, online textbook available at www.AmericanYawp.com. I have also written extensively for the general public on the state of soccer (football), and the role it plays in global, colonial, and cultural history, especially in the United States and post-colonial Africa. I am also developing an interactive, undergraduate capstone course on the cultural and political value of the sport in the World Cup era (1930-present).

I am excited to contribute my experiences and ideas to Teaching United States History, and look forward to becoming part of a remarkable and timely pedagogical movement.