Barry Goldberg
PhD candidate, City University of New York
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I am a Ph.D. Candidate in History at the CUNY Graduate Center. I teach courses in United States History (both halves), African-American History, and American Labor History at CUNY Queens College. Before entering graduate school, I also taught Advanced Placement U.S. History to high school students in Chicago. Students in my courses engage with history by performing close readings of select secondary sources and analyzing a myriad of primary sources, including political cartoons, telephone recordings, photographs, film clips, and music. By integrating these sources into both class and homework assignments, I aim to blend literacy skill development with opportunities for students to participate in more fluid and interactive discussions.

My research examines post-1945 U.S. political, social, and urban history, with a particular focus on race and ethnicity. I am currently working on a dissertation that analyzes the development of interracial politics — mainly, though not exclusively, in the realm of Jewish-Puerto Rican relations — on New York’s Lower East Side from the 1960s through the 1990s.

I am delighted to be contributing to the TUSH blog and hope to attain new pedagogical strategies from others committed to the teaching of history. 

More information about my professional background and my CV can be found here.

I am a Ph.D. Candidate in History at the CUNY Graduate Center. I teach courses in United States History (both halves), African-American History, and American Labor History at CUNY Queens College. Before entering graduate school, I also taught Advanced Placement U.S. History to high school students in Chicago. Students in my courses engage with history by performing close readings of select secondary sources and analyzing a myriad of primary sources, including political cartoons, telephone recordings, photographs, film clips, and music. By integrating these sources into both class and homework assignments, I aim to blend literacy skill development with opportunities for students to participate in more fluid and interactive discussions.

My research examines post-1945 U.S. political, social, and urban history, with a particular focus on race and ethnicity. I am currently working on a dissertation that analyzes the development of interracial politics — mainly, though not exclusively, in the realm of Jewish-Puerto Rican relations — on New York’s Lower East Side from the 1960s through the 1990s.

I am delighted to be contributing to the TUSH blog and hope to attain new pedagogical strategies from others committed to the teaching of history. 

More information about my professional background and my CV can be found here.