Glen Olson
PhD candidate, City University of New York
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I am a PhD candidate at the City University of New York Graduate Center, and a teaching fellow at Hunter College. My MA is from University of Chicago and BA from St. John’s College. I’ve led discussion sections for both halves of the US survey. Recently I got the chance to teach a course focusing on immigration history to high school students as part of CUNY’s College Now program. Before coming to graduate school I worked with middle and high school students in both US and world history.

My research focus is the 19th century United States, and I am broadly interested in slavery, empire, immigration and the history of capitalism. My dissertation, “Slavery’s Leviathan: Southern Visions of Federal Governance, 1815-1860,” examines how slaveholders sought to strengthen certain federal institutions to protect their property regime.

Coming from a small liberal arts college background, I am biased toward group discussion, and am constantly looking for new ways to facilitate conversation in class lessons. I am also very interested in learning how secondary and postsecondary instructors can collaborate to scaffold the study of history from a student’s first exposure through college. In the past, reading TUSH helped me question my pedagogical assumptions, and I relish the chance to contribute to the conversation on how we can become better teachers.

I can be reached at glenjolson@gmail.com, and my CV can be found here.

I am a PhD candidate at the City University of New York Graduate Center, and a teaching fellow at Hunter College. My MA is from University of Chicago and BA from St. John’s College. I’ve led discussion sections for both halves of the US survey. Recently I got the chance to teach a course focusing on immigration history to high school students as part of CUNY’s College Now program. Before coming to graduate school I worked with middle and high school students in both US and world history.

My research focus is the 19th century United States, and I am broadly interested in slavery, empire, immigration and the history of capitalism. My dissertation, “Slavery’s Leviathan: Southern Visions of Federal Governance, 1815-1860,” examines how slaveholders sought to strengthen certain federal institutions to protect their property regime.

Coming from a small liberal arts college background, I am biased toward group discussion, and am constantly looking for new ways to facilitate conversation in class lessons. I am also very interested in learning how secondary and postsecondary instructors can collaborate to scaffold the study of history from a student’s first exposure through college. In the past, reading TUSH helped me question my pedagogical assumptions, and I relish the chance to contribute to the conversation on how we can become better teachers.

I can be reached at glenjolson@gmail.com, and my CV can be found here.