Nora Slonimsky
PhD candidate, City University of New York
Read Nora's Posts

I am a PhD candidate in history at the CUNY Graduate Center focusing on the intersection of publishing, federalism and intellectual property in the Early Republic. I am currently a fellow at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. I was previously a graduate teaching fellow at Hunter College and a writing across the curriculum (WAC) fellow at Lehman College.

While at Hunter, I taught courses on colonial, early national and antebellum American history, with a comparative, transatlantic emphasis. I believe that the classroom should be a collaborative, communicative space in which students engage with primary, secondary and current materials in order to build connections between the past and present, particularly for the development of critical-thinking skills relevant to their personal, intellectual, and professional development. I also deeply value and emphasize the importance between teaching and my own research, viewing the classroom and the archive as interconnected, reinforcing spaces.

Coming from an interdisciplinary background, my work draws on the multiple approaches of book and political history, literary studies, legal culture and the digital humanities. My dissertation, “The Engine of Free Expression” [?]: The Political Economy of Copyright in the Colonial British Atlantic and Early National United States, studies the place of literary property in eighteenth and early nineteenth century politics as well as its role in the development of free expression as both a conceptual and commercial construct. Between the British Statute of Anne of 1710 and the United States Copyright Act of 1831, I argue that copyright was an integral part of the broader project of federal nation building, particularly through discourses on cartography, land, sedition, and sovereignty.

For my curriculum vitae and other information, please see: https://gc-cuny.academia.edu/NoraSlonimsky

I am a PhD candidate in history at the CUNY Graduate Center focusing on the intersection of publishing, federalism and intellectual property in the Early Republic. I am currently a fellow at the McNeil Center for Early American Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. I was previously a graduate teaching fellow at Hunter College and a writing across the curriculum (WAC) fellow at Lehman College.

While at Hunter, I taught courses on colonial, early national and antebellum American history, with a comparative, transatlantic emphasis. I believe that the classroom should be a collaborative, communicative space in which students engage with primary, secondary and current materials in order to build connections between the past and present, particularly for the development of critical-thinking skills relevant to their personal, intellectual, and professional development. I also deeply value and emphasize the importance between teaching and my own research, viewing the classroom and the archive as interconnected, reinforcing spaces.

Coming from an interdisciplinary background, my work draws on the multiple approaches of book and political history, literary studies, legal culture and the digital humanities. My dissertation, “The Engine of Free Expression” [?]: The Political Economy of Copyright in the Colonial British Atlantic and Early National United States, studies the place of literary property in eighteenth and early nineteenth century politics as well as its role in the development of free expression as both a conceptual and commercial construct. Between the British Statute of Anne of 1710 and the United States Copyright Act of 1831, I argue that copyright was an integral part of the broader project of federal nation building, particularly through discourses on cartography, land, sedition, and sovereignty.

For my curriculum vitae and other information, please see: https://gc-cuny.academia.edu/NoraSlonimsky