The Urgency of LGBTQ Visibility in Survey Courses

Most survey textbooks and courses focus on LGBTQ history only a few times at most and usually only in the latter half of the twentieth century.  For some time, Stonewall has been included in U.S. history textbooks and courses.  Other topics commonly covered in more recent years are the AIDS crisis and the Lavender Scare…

Teach My Book: Jelani M. Favors, Shelter in a Time of Storm: How Black Colleges Fostered Generations of Leadership and Activism

Teaching United States History is excited to present Teach My Book, a series of posts where distinguished authors reflect on their work and how instructors might integrate their insights into the classroom. Our thoughts today come from Jelani M. Favors, Associate Professor of History at Clayton State University. Dr. Favors is discussing his new book Shelter…

Teaching with Historians At The Movies

I’ve had a lot of requests recently to write about how to use Historians At The Movies in history classrooms and I think now is a good time to talk about how we can use public history and film medium as a way of engaging our students. http:// Ok, let’s try this again. Fans of…

Cults, Chakras, and Crunchy Granola in the Classroom

This guest post is from Daniel Gorman Jr., a history Ph.D. candidate, an Andrew W. Mellon Digital Humanities Fellow, and president of the Graduate Student Association at the University of Rochester.    When applications opened at my university for summer courses — courses that meet three hours per day, four days per week, for four weeks…

Teaching HUMANities

In one of the first assignments of the year, I asked my new eleventh grade American Studies students to “write ~2 pages on what America you live in.” The only other guidance I gave them was, “Some things you may think about are your location, citizenship, religion, race, class, gender, etc.” and “There is no…