Teach My Book: W. Caleb McDaniel’s, Sweet Taste of Liberty: A True Story of Slavery and Restitution in America

Teaching United States History is excited to present Teach My Book, a series of posts where distinguished authors reflect on their work and how instructors might integrate their insights into the classroom. Our thoughts today come from W. Caleb McDaniel, Associate Professor of History at Rice University. Dr. McDaniel is the author of The Problem of…

Readings on Teaching History and Social Studies

On August 15, I tweeted about how relatively few Ph.D. programs in History have in-depth courses on teaching and I offered to send my teaching methods syllabi to anyone who might be interested. I was not prepared for what happened next—over 200 people asked for my syllabi! The overwhelming response for readings about teaching stirred…

The Pros and Cons of Teaching with Zoom

Is technology always student centered? How can teachers design online lessons to address students’ needs? In this blog post, I talk about the pros and cons of Zoom—a communications software that allows video conferencing—from the perspective of a student and an instructor. Zoom facilitates communication across continents, and, in this respect, is remarkable. For the…

How will I teach this course next time?

How will I teach this course next time? What changes will I make? What worked? What flopped? These are the questions that all teachers must ask themselves. As “Witnessing the Sixties” draws to a close, I am reflecting on its second coming, which will occur in January 2020. Demonstrating growth and willingness to improve a…

Why does history matter?

Visiting one of the museums here in Bergen, I walked through the rooms of Edvard Munch’s work, stopping in front of Ungdom (Youth). Ungdom is a large portrait of a boy with a multicolored background behind him that looks, in many ways, like waves. As I stared at the portrait, I walked closer and peered…